Berwick-upon-Tweed: In order to win back public trust on immigration, business in the UK needs to consider its role and responsibilities

Berwick-upon-Tweed in Northumberland was our fourth and final destination for our visits to the North East. Just two miles south of the border, administration of the town has passed between England and Scotland changed hands at least 13 times in its history. It is a market town and the largest settlement in the area. Consequently, Read more about Berwick-upon-Tweed: In order to win back public trust on immigration, business in the UK needs to consider its role and responsibilities[…]

Aberystwyth: welcoming newcomers and preserving local culture

We returned to Wales this week and visited Aberystwyth, a university town in Ceredigion, a predominantly rural local authority. Although our citizens’ panel thought that migration had brought benefits to this part of West Wales, they were also concerned about cultural change and threats to the Welsh language. “I agree with the benefits and the Read more about Aberystwyth: welcoming newcomers and preserving local culture[…]

Lincoln: Why language matters

Our last East Midlands visit was to Lincoln where our much of citizens’ panel discussion focused on language barriers. From being a non-diverse cathedral city some 25 years ago, Lincoln and its environs have seen the arrival of significant numbers of both EU migrants and international students. The pace of change has caused some tension Read more about Lincoln: Why language matters[…]

Preston: “Integration comes down to respect, respect for yourself and for everybody else”

Our final visit to the North West was to Preston in Lancashire. Here our citizens’ panel comprised those of white and Asian Muslim heritage. All of our Muslim participants had a recent family experience of migration and we interested to see how their views on immigration and integration differed from the white British participants. After Read more about Preston: “Integration comes down to respect, respect for yourself and for everybody else”[…]

The National Conversation: Findings from the West Midlands

We have released our first regional batch of reports today, each a local summary of what we round in five diverse towns and cities across the West Midlands, available here.   Getting integration right in the West Midlands will be key to building trust and consensus on immigration, according to the reports from the biggest-ever public consultation Read more about The National Conversation: Findings from the West Midlands[…]

Bristol: In the future city, we will no longer ask those that we meet, “where are you from?”

As part of the Festival of Ideas Future Cities, the National Conversation spent two days in Bristol talking about immigration, and how we can make it work in the future city. The festival focussed on the question “how do we make the cities that we really want to live in?”  Immigration needs to work for everyone Read more about Bristol: In the future city, we will no longer ask those that we meet, “where are you from?”[…]

Folkestone: If we are to connect communities, we need to look beyond any migrant/citizen divide

Folkestone, a Kentish town in the South East of England was our 34th visit, as the National Conversation continues its journey across the country. An area with a long and complex history of international migration and a seaside town drawing in people from across the UK, the conversations we had in Folkestone reflected that integration Read more about Folkestone: If we are to connect communities, we need to look beyond any migrant/citizen divide[…]

Leicester: a city that understands migration to be part of its past and present

Contribution and control were the clear priorities of the citizens’ panel in Leicester, the 24th location for the National Conversation on Immigration, on what the government could do to increase public confidence in immigration after Britain leaves the European Union. The emphasis on contribution reflected both the recognition that Leicester has benefitted from immigration in Read more about Leicester: a city that understands migration to be part of its past and present[…]

Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration

The 17th stop for the National Conversation was Milton Keynes, a town celebrating its 50th birthday this year; once a quiet Buckinghamshire village the Milton Keynes we see today was developed as a purpose built town to ease the overspill of London. As a new town, Milton Keynes has been built on migration. As a Read more about Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration[…]

Merthyr Tydfil: Integration needs to be an ‘everybody’ issue

Merthyr Tydfil was the tenth stop for the National Conversation. It is a town that was built by migrants coming to mine its coal, stoke its furnaces and to work in its factories. Despite this long history of migration, a strong identity and an active labour movement, it is a town where new arrivals and Read more about Merthyr Tydfil: Integration needs to be an ‘everybody’ issue[…]