Redbridge: is London its very own ‘crowded island’?

The National Conversation continued its tour around the country, visiting Redbridge, an ethnically diverse outer London borough. Redbridge’s houses and streets tell a story about integration in Britain. It is a place where generations of immigrants settled, on their journey from the East End to the Home Counties. Many Redbridge residents have Irish ancestors and Read more about Redbridge: is London its very own ‘crowded island’?[…]

Lerwick: Migration is a topical issue in rural areas like Shetland

Shetland is no stranger to immigration and emigration. Since pre-historic times it has seen the arrival of different peoples. Following Viking colonisation, Shetland was a Norwegian rule until the 15th century after which it was annexed by Scotland. The Scandinavian influence can still be seen in Shetland’s words, accents and faces. Centuries on, work continues Read more about Lerwick: Migration is a topical issue in rural areas like Shetland[…]

Paisley: How does political and religious leadership influence attitudes to immigration

Paisley, Renfrewshire just outside of Glasgow, is a place where the 19th century textile boom has left its mark, with grand sandstone buildings and monuments on almost every corner. But the decline of industry has taken away wealth from the town and many people now commute into Glasgow for work. While median wages are above Read more about Paisley: How does political and religious leadership influence attitudes to immigration[…]

Cambridge: Housing is a basic need, whatever our nationality

The National Conversation made its second visit to Cambridgeshire last week. Last February, we visited the Fens, and held a stakeholder meeting and citizens’ panel in the town of March, which has seen rapid migration from the EU. Our second visit was to Cambridge, an ancient seat of European learning. With 72% of voters in Read more about Cambridge: Housing is a basic need, whatever our nationality[…]

Nottingham: Do young people see migration differently?

This week we travelled to Nottingham to hear from our 16 to 22 year old panel, to see whether young people speak differently about immigration. The panel was representative of their age group:  most of the panel were working and relatively few were university students. The group saw that the benefits of immigration outweighed any Read more about Nottingham: Do young people see migration differently?[…]

Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration

The 17th stop for the National Conversation was Milton Keynes, a town celebrating its 50th birthday this year; once a quiet Buckinghamshire village the Milton Keynes we see today was developed as a purpose built town to ease the overspill of London. As a new town, Milton Keynes has been built on migration. As a Read more about Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration[…]

Dungannon: Why are attitudes to migration so different in this small, rural town?

Dungannon, 40 miles west of Belfast, could easily be compared to March, Cambridgeshire- which the National Conversation visited earlier on this year. Both towns sit within vast rural hinterlands, share an economic focus on agri-manufacturing and as a result, have seen rapid migration over the last fifteen years. Migration trends to both places began from Read more about Dungannon: Why are attitudes to migration so different in this small, rural town?[…]

The Potteries: “Immigration has got an image problem”

The National Conversation’s visit to the Potteries gave us the opportunity to have a wide-ranging discussion about immigration on the area, with issues such as asylum dispersal raised by our citizens’ panel as well as some of the economic trade-offs involved in future immigration policy. The citizens’ panel also discussed the role of different sources Read more about The Potteries: “Immigration has got an image problem”[…]

Merthyr Tydfil: Integration needs to be an ‘everybody’ issue

Merthyr Tydfil was the tenth stop for the National Conversation. It is a town that was built by migrants coming to mine its coal, stoke its furnaces and to work in its factories. Despite this long history of migration, a strong identity and an active labour movement, it is a town where new arrivals and Read more about Merthyr Tydfil: Integration needs to be an ‘everybody’ issue[…]

Southampton: Language is a key factor in building cohesive communities

The ninth stop for the National Conversation on Immigration was Southampton, a University city and part of a built-up south coast metropolis of 1.6 million people. As a port, Southampton has had a long history of immigration and emigration. More recently, an estimated 20,000 Poles – about one in ten of the total population – Read more about Southampton: Language is a key factor in building cohesive communities[…]