Ipswich: Why is the Australian points based system so popular?

We held two citizens’ panels in Ipswich and divided them by gender as we interested if there were differences in the way that men and women talk about immigration. We have already blogged on what we found, but both groups had a lot to say about migration for work. Like every previous citizens panel, many Read more about Ipswich: Why is the Australian points based system so popular?[…]

Ipswich: Does gender influence the way we think or talk about immigration?

  The way we think about immigration is complicated, determined by a number of factors such as where we live, who we interact with, our education, where we work, and what is happening around us at any one time. We heard a lot about divides in the ways older and younger people see immigration after Read more about Ipswich: Does gender influence the way we think or talk about immigration?[…]

Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration

The 17th stop for the National Conversation was Milton Keynes, a town celebrating its 50th birthday this year; once a quiet Buckinghamshire village the Milton Keynes we see today was developed as a purpose built town to ease the overspill of London. As a new town, Milton Keynes has been built on migration. As a Read more about Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration[…]

Derry/Londonderry: Brexit anxieties and border disputes

Our second Northern Ireland panel was held in the city of Derry or Londonderry, where again the discussion often focussed on issues that were specific to immigration and integration policy in Northern Ireland. These included fears that a hard land border between Ireland and the UK would jeopardise the peace process. Although our panel included Read more about Derry/Londonderry: Brexit anxieties and border disputes[…]

Dungannon: Why are attitudes to migration so different in this small, rural town?

Dungannon, 40 miles west of Belfast, could easily be compared to March, Cambridgeshire- which the National Conversation visited earlier on this year. Both towns sit within vast rural hinterlands, share an economic focus on agri-manufacturing and as a result, have seen rapid migration over the last fifteen years. Migration trends to both places began from Read more about Dungannon: Why are attitudes to migration so different in this small, rural town?[…]

The Potteries: “Immigration has got an image problem”

The National Conversation’s visit to the Potteries gave us the opportunity to have a wide-ranging discussion about immigration on the area, with issues such as asylum dispersal raised by our citizens’ panel as well as some of the economic trade-offs involved in future immigration policy. The citizens’ panel also discussed the role of different sources Read more about The Potteries: “Immigration has got an image problem”[…]

Bolton: Perceptions of immigration built from how we see integration

The National Conversation was in Bolton yesterday, the 11th stop on the national journey; a former mill town in the North West, built from the migration of Flemish settlers in the 14th century with a sizeable South Asian community today. The town, part of Greater Manchester, is still coming to terms with the appalling terrorist Read more about Bolton: Perceptions of immigration built from how we see integration[…]

Merthyr Tydfil: Integration needs to be an ‘everybody’ issue

Merthyr Tydfil was the tenth stop for the National Conversation. It is a town that was built by migrants coming to mine its coal, stoke its furnaces and to work in its factories. Despite this long history of migration, a strong identity and an active labour movement, it is a town where new arrivals and Read more about Merthyr Tydfil: Integration needs to be an ‘everybody’ issue[…]

Southampton: Language is a key factor in building cohesive communities

The ninth stop for the National Conversation on Immigration was Southampton, a University city and part of a built-up south coast metropolis of 1.6 million people. As a port, Southampton has had a long history of immigration and emigration. More recently, an estimated 20,000 Poles – about one in ten of the total population – Read more about Southampton: Language is a key factor in building cohesive communities[…]

Northampton: Economic grievances with immigration more than a single issue

Employment and quality of life issues dominated the discussion when the National Conversation on Immigration visited Northampton on Wednesday. It also made us question what we mean by ‘left behind’ – a term that has become part of the political lexicon since the referendum. A fast train line to London has attracted those who are Read more about Northampton: Economic grievances with immigration more than a single issue[…]