Leicester: a city that understands migration to be part of its past and present

Contribution and control were the clear priorities of the citizens’ panel in Leicester, the 24th location for the National Conversation on Immigration, on what the government could do to increase public confidence in immigration after Britain leaves the European Union. The emphasis on contribution reflected both the recognition that Leicester has benefitted from immigration in Read more about Leicester: a city that understands migration to be part of its past and present[…]

Cambridge: Housing is a basic need, whatever our nationality

The National Conversation made its second visit to Cambridgeshire last week. Last February, we visited the Fens, and held a stakeholder meeting and citizens’ panel in the town of March, which has seen rapid migration from the EU. Our second visit was to Cambridge, an ancient seat of European learning. With 72% of voters in Read more about Cambridge: Housing is a basic need, whatever our nationality[…]

Wolverhampton: Generational change and historical legacies of migration

We often talk about whether or not we have talked enough about immigration in Britain.  But Wolverhampton, the 22nd location for the National Conversation on Immigration, has definitely been talking about immigration for at least half a century, since it was the city’s MP Enoch Powell who made the most infamously famous contribution to the Read more about Wolverhampton: Generational change and historical legacies of migration[…]

Shrewsbury: Are we more divided on immigration than we think?

Shrewsbury was the 21st stop for the National Conversation, an ancient Shropshire town on the Welsh border. As with any place we visit, we hold a meeting with stakeholders before our citizens’ panel. Each meeting sees a different mix of people working in fields that will be impacted most by changes to future immigration policy. Read more about Shrewsbury: Are we more divided on immigration than we think?[…]

Nottingham: Do young people see migration differently?

This week we travelled to Nottingham to hear from our 16 to 22 year old panel, to see whether young people speak differently about immigration. The panel was representative of their age group:  most of the panel were working and relatively few were university students. The group saw that the benefits of immigration outweighed any Read more about Nottingham: Do young people see migration differently?[…]

Ipswich: Why is the Australian points based system so popular?

We held two citizens’ panels in Ipswich and divided them by gender as we interested if there were differences in the way that men and women talk about immigration. We have already blogged on what we found, but both groups had a lot to say about migration for work. Like every previous citizens panel, many Read more about Ipswich: Why is the Australian points based system so popular?[…]

Ipswich: Does gender influence the way we think or talk about immigration?

  The way we think about immigration is complicated, determined by a number of factors such as where we live, who we interact with, our education, where we work, and what is happening around us at any one time. We heard a lot about divides in the ways older and younger people see immigration after Read more about Ipswich: Does gender influence the way we think or talk about immigration?[…]

Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration

The 17th stop for the National Conversation was Milton Keynes, a town celebrating its 50th birthday this year; once a quiet Buckinghamshire village the Milton Keynes we see today was developed as a purpose built town to ease the overspill of London. As a new town, Milton Keynes has been built on migration. As a Read more about Milton Keynes: How the built environment affects the way we think about immigration[…]

Derry/Londonderry: Brexit anxieties and border disputes

Our second Northern Ireland panel was held in the city of Derry or Londonderry, where again the discussion often focussed on issues that were specific to immigration and integration policy in Northern Ireland. These included fears that a hard land border between Ireland and the UK would jeopardise the peace process. Although our panel included Read more about Derry/Londonderry: Brexit anxieties and border disputes[…]

Dungannon: Why are attitudes to migration so different in this small, rural town?

Dungannon, 40 miles west of Belfast, could easily be compared to March, Cambridgeshire- which the National Conversation visited earlier on this year. Both towns sit within vast rural hinterlands, share an economic focus on agri-manufacturing and as a result, have seen rapid migration over the last fifteen years. Migration trends to both places began from Read more about Dungannon: Why are attitudes to migration so different in this small, rural town?[…]