Preston: “Integration comes down to respect, respect for yourself and for everybody else”

Our final visit to the North West was to Preston in Lancashire. Here our citizens’ panel comprised those of white and Asian Muslim heritage. All of our Muslim participants had a recent family experience of migration and we interested to see how their views on immigration and integration differed from the white British participants. After Read more about Preston: “Integration comes down to respect, respect for yourself and for everybody else”[…]

Harrogate: Future EU migration and public trust

We held our fourth Yorkshire and Humberside National Conversation discussion in Harrogate, a prosperous commuter town and tourist destination in the Dales, some 15 miles north of Leeds. Twenty years ago, Harrogate’s population was largely of white British ethnicity. Today, nearly 6% of the population has been born overseas, as a result of migration from Read more about Harrogate: Future EU migration and public trust[…]

Macclesfield: Immigration, the NHS and Brexit trade-offs

The National Conversation on Immigration has just returned from Macclesfield, a comfortably-off Cheshire market town of 50,000 people. Here we found that migration was not a hugely salient issue. In our citizens’ panel discussion everyone saw positives as well as challenges: “Migration is crucial to business. In pubs and hotels we rely on people from Read more about Macclesfield: Immigration, the NHS and Brexit trade-offs[…]

The National Conversation: Findings from the West Midlands

We have released our first regional batch of reports today, each a local summary of what we round in five diverse towns and cities across the West Midlands, available here.   Getting integration right in the West Midlands will be key to building trust and consensus on immigration, according to the reports from the biggest-ever public consultation Read more about The National Conversation: Findings from the West Midlands[…]

Newport: How does the connectivity of port cities shape attitudes to immigration?

Newport, a city on the Severn Estuary in South Wales was the National Conversation’s 41st stop. Our citizens’ panel, local residents including two newly arrived asylum seekers, saw Newport as a typical city where over many years migration had become a normal part of life. “We had Italians coming over, Asians, people from the Commonwealth Read more about Newport: How does the connectivity of port cities shape attitudes to immigration?[…]

Hull: Where regeneration has accompanied immigration

Hull, a city of 260,000 people was the National Conversation’s 44th stop. The citizens’ panel in Hull were a balanced group, who centred fairness in how they saw both the contributions and challenges brought by migration. They felt that migrants often took jobs that British people “don’t want to do”, such as factory work with Read more about Hull: Where regeneration has accompanied immigration[…]

Swansea: Immigration is only one among the many issues facing this country

Swansea was the National Conversation’s second visit to Wales, the second largest city in Wales. Here our citizens’ panel told us that they felt Swansea’s history as a port meant that they had got used to migration. “I think it’s a bit different in port cities, we are used to foreign faces and different cultures.” Read more about Swansea: Immigration is only one among the many issues facing this country[…]

Kidderminster: Regaining trust on immigration will also involve targeting those who trigger further division in our communities

Kidderminster in Worcestershire was the National Conversation’s 43rd visit. Our citizens’ panel in Kidderminster were mostly blue-collar workers and retirees, an anti-establishment group who were mostly ‘balancers’, seeing both positive contributions as well as challenges posed by immigration. “There’s a lot of doctors coming in and people training to be nurses and working long hours, Read more about Kidderminster: Regaining trust on immigration will also involve targeting those who trigger further division in our communities[…]

Guildford: As Brexit negotiations continue, what do people really mean by ‘control’?

Guildford, a Surrey town of about 140,000 people was the 39th stop for the national conversation.  Guildford is a fairly prosperous place, with unemployment around half of the national average, and a growing population, which rose by 7,500 (almost 6%) between the 2001 and 2011 census. This was reflected in how pragmatic support for migrants coming to Read more about Guildford: As Brexit negotiations continue, what do people really mean by ‘control’?[…]